Relief Podcast

Episode 1: Care

This weekly podcast brings listeners joy and comfort for these uncertain times.

The Akron Art Museum’s staff shares insights from their own lives combined with conversations about the collection and interviews with regional artists and musicians.

Join us every Tuesday.

Care

This week the topic is Care. Seema and Gina share some of their thoughts about how care has changed in the context of Stay and Home.

Deep Dive with Brian Bress

Click to learn about Brian Bress’s 2019 solo show at the Akron Art Museum, “Brian Bress: Pictures Become You

Learn more about Bress and watch his digital works: http://brianbress.com/ Bress can be found on Instagram @brianbress

Hear from Bress about his process and background:

VIEW More Brian Bress Pt.1
VIEW More Brian Bress Pt.2
VIEW More Brian Bress Pt.3
VIEW More Brian Press Pt. 4

Shop Talk with So Fun Studio

So Fun Studio is Erin Guido and John Paul Costello — a lively collaborative duo living in Ohio City. Together, they create joyful and light-hearted interactive public art and products. Some of which you may have seen around Cleveland and at the Akron Art Museum’s Please Touch! exhibit in 2017. Hear them talk about their love for Brian Bress, how creating is self-care, and their must-have desert island studio needs.

https://www.sofunstudio.com
https://www.eringuido.com
https://johnpaulcostello.myportfolio.com
Instagram: @sofunstudio @egweeds @Jpcform

So Fun Studio mentions:
https://ohpinkpartyshop.com
https://houseparty.com

Relief Podcast Music

Jordan King is a multi-instrumentalist based in Kent, Ohio. Through his music project, Swell Tides, he has worked with Akron Recording Company and Electric Company Records. His work has been featured in the Devil Strip, Cleveland Scene, Akron Recording Company’s Where the Hell is Akron, OH? Vol. 2. Find Swell Tides on Bandcamp and Spotify, and stay in tune with upcoming shows on Instagram @swelltides

https://smelltides.bandcamp.com/

https://soundcloud.com/akronartmuseum/relief-podcast-episode-1-brian-bress

Elias Sime: Tightrope

Complex tableaus made with nontraditional materials

Elias Sime: Tightrope, the first major traveling survey dedicated to the Ethiopian artist’s work, is on display at the Akron Art Museum through May 24. Sime’s March 29 artist talk has been canceled as part of public health efforts, but you can take a close look at his large-scale tableaus made of reclaimed electronic components and learn more about the artist’s work in his own words through this virtual tour on all AAM’s social platforms. Enjoy the #MuseumatHome.

Elias Sime: Tightrope is organized by the Ruth and Elmer Wellin Museum of Art at Hamilton College, Clinton, New York.

Its presentation in Akron is made possible through the generous support of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation; Ohio Arts Council; The Tom and Marilyn Merryweather Fund; the Kenneth L. Calhoun Charitable Trust, KeyBank, Trustee; Katie and Mark Smucker; and Mr. and Mrs. Joseph S. Kanfer.

Elias Sime, Tightrope detail, Reclaimed electronic components and insulated wire on panel
Elias Sime, Tightrope: (9) While Observing . . . (detail), 2018, Reclaimed electronic components and insulated wire on panel, 94 3/8 x 63 3/8 in., Collection of Robert and Karen Duncan, Lincoln, NE. Photo by Mike Crupi.

Each material I collect has its own story. It has its own language. Every story has a beginning. I think about the first person who thought or dreamed of it and all the people who transformed that dream into a material. I also think about the various people who used and reused the material before it landed in my hands. I never worry about how old or new the material is. My art is not about recycling or repurposing material but about expressing my ideas. For instance, when I first saw a motherboard, it reminded me of a city, of landscapes, as well as of the people in the factory who assembled it.
— Elias Sime

Elias Sime, Tightrope detail, Reclaimed electronic components and insulated wire on panel
Elias Sime, Tightrope: Surface and Shadow 2 (detail), 2016, Reclaimed electronic components and buttons on panel, 9 ft. 5/8 in. x 17 ft. 5/8 in., Pizzuti Collection, Columbus, OH. Photo by Mike Crupi.

I have done a lot of work using clothes buttons. When you wake up in the morning, you open your button or button-up, and you do that with care. It is an expression of love. It puts you in contact with your body… [Buttons] tell the stories of the persons who used them; the human traces they hold are expressions of love. — Elias Sime

Elias Sime, Tightrope detail, Reclaimed electronic components and insulated wire on panel
Elias Sime, Tightrope: Silent 1 (detail), 2019, Reclaimed electronic components on panel, 72 1/2 in. x 10 ft. 6 in., Courtesy of the artist and James Cohan, New York. Photo by Mike Crupi.

It took me a great deal of time to collect the keyboards. Keyboards have evolved very quickly — the ones today use a completely different technology from a couple of decades ago, but their colors are monochromatic, which gives an impression of silence. Sometimes, thoughts are expressed through noise, and other times, through silence. The keyboard is not loud, but it is full of symbols. — Elias Sime

Elias Sime, Tightrope detail, Reclaimed electronic components and insulated wire on panel
Elias Sime, Tightrope: Hands and Feet (detail), 2009–14, Reclaimed electronic components and insulated wire on panel, 71 in. x 10 ft. 10 1/4 in., Collection of Nancy and Joseph Chetrit, New York. Photo by Mike Crupi.

The only thing I think about when I pick the cellular phone motherboard, for instance, is the excitement of the person who owned it the first time they got it. The hope they felt about the future, the eagerness to use it. That, for me, is what love is all about. To realize that we are all connected and that human contact, that touch, is created in every object we take for granted. — Elias Sime

Elias Sime, Tightrope detail, Reclaimed electronic components and insulated wire on panel
Elias Sime, Tightrope: (8) While Observing . . . (detail), 2018, Reclaimed electronic components and insulated wire on panel, 86 3/4 x 46 5/8 in., Courtesy of the artist and James Cohan, New York. Photo by Mike Crupi.

The materials I select, by the time they get into my hands, they’ve been touched by so many people, and now they’re in my hands. Even though it may not be visible, when you’re working on your personal computer, you leave a part of you on that. Then, when it breaks, there is somebody else who goes inside it and touches it: there’s that fingerprint, that connection that you can even have with the machine. Technology is very tactile. It’s connected to us. That doesn’t mean it’s going to be beneficial for us, 100 percent. It actually made us lose a lot of things, too. It gave us speed. But we have also lost that calmness, tranquility, and quiet. — Elias Sime

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An Interview with Timothy Horn Pt. 5

In the fourth part of our five-part interview, Dread & Delight Artist Timothy Horn, creator of “Mother-Lode” discusses what it was like working with sugar as an artistic medium.

Another dramatic work included in the exhibit is “Mother-Load,” created by the artist Timothy Horn. The sculpture is a child-sized, Cinderella-like carriage that was created using a variety of materials, but most notably it is coated in a layer of rock sugar and shellac.

The piece was created originally for a show at the de Young Museum in San Francisco. It was inspired by the “rags-to-riches story” of Alma Spreckels, the collector whose sugar fortune was used to found what is now part of the museum. She came from modest beginnings and rose to great wealth. She was never fully accepted by San Francisco society and had distant relationships with all of her children. This piece is Horn’s take on a gilded 18th-century Neapolitan sedan chair that Spreckels used as a phone booth in her home. Spreckels had a less-than-perfect life though she achieved great wealth. Horn’s sculpture explores and highlights the temporary nature of our existence while at the same time calling into question the values in a society that helped to shape the life of a person like Alma Spreckels.

ANDERSON TURNER / ABJ/OHIO.COM CORRESPONDENT
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An Interview with Timothy Horn Pt. 4

Timothy Horn – “Mother-Load”

In the fourth part of our five-part interview, Dread & Delight Artist Timothy Horn, creator of “Mother-Lode” discusses what it was like working with sugar as an artistic medium.

Another dramatic work included in the exhibit is “Mother-Load,” created by the artist Timothy Horn. The sculpture is a child-sized, Cinderella-like carriage that was created using a variety of materials, but most notably it is coated in a layer of rock sugar and shellac.

The piece was created originally for a show at the de Young Museum in San Francisco. It was inspired by the “rags-to-riches story” of Alma Spreckels, the collector whose sugar fortune was used to found what is now part of the museum. She came from modest beginnings and rose to great wealth. She was never fully accepted by San Francisco society and had distant relationships with all of her children. This piece is Horn’s take on a gilded 18th-century Neapolitan sedan chair that Spreckels used as a phone booth in her home. Spreckels had a less-than-perfect life though she achieved great wealth. Horn’s sculpture explores and highlights the temporary nature of our existence while at the same time calling into question the values in a society that helped to shape the life of a person like Alma Spreckels.

ANDERSON TURNER / ABJ/OHIO.COM CORRESPONDENT
Read More

An Interview with Timothy Horn Pt.3

Timothy Horn – “Mother-Lode”

In the third of our five-part interview, Dread & Delight Artist Timothy Horn, creator of “Mother-Lode” discusses his inspiration for the carriage itself.

Another dramatic work included in the exhibit is “Mother-Load,” created by the artist Timothy Horn. The sculpture is a child-sized, Cinderella-like carriage that was created using a variety of materials, but most notably it is coated in a layer of rock sugar and shellac.

The piece was created originally for a show at the de Young Museum in San Francisco. It was inspired by the “rags-to-riches story” of Alma Spreckels, the collector whose sugar fortune was used to found what is now part of the museum. She came from modest beginnings and rose to great wealth. She was never fully accepted by San Francisco society and had distant relationships with all of her children. This piece is Horn’s take on a gilded 18th-century Neapolitan sedan chair that Spreckels used as a phone booth in her home. Spreckels had a less-than-perfect life though she achieved great wealth. Horn’s sculpture explores and highlights the temporary nature of our existence while at the same time calling into question the values in a society that helped to shape the life of a person like Alma Spreckels.

ANDERSON TURNER / ABJ/OHIO.COM CORRESPONDENT

Read More

An Interview with Timothy Horn Pt. 2

In the second of our five-part interview, Dread & Delight Artist Timothy Horn, creator of “Mother-Lode” discusses how he became interested in fairy tales.

Another dramatic work included in the exhibit is “Mother-Load,” created by the artist Timothy Horn. The sculpture is a child-sized, Cinderella-like carriage that was created using a variety of materials, but most notably it is coated in a layer of rock sugar and shellac.

The piece was created originally for a show at the de Young Museum in San Francisco. It was inspired by the “rags-to-riches story” of Alma Spreckels, the collector whose sugar fortune was used to found what is now part of the museum. She came from modest beginnings and rose to great wealth. She was never fully accepted by San Francisco society and had distant relationships with all of her children. This piece is Horn’s take on a gilded 18th-century Neapolitan sedan chair that Spreckels used as a phone booth in her home. Spreckels had a less-than-perfect life though she achieved great wealth. Horn’s sculpture explores and highlights the temporary nature of our existence while at the same time calling into question the values in a society that helped to shape the life of a person like Alma Spreckels.

ANDERSON TURNER / ABJ/OHIO.COM CORRESPONDENT
Read More

An Interview With Timothy Horn, Pt. 1

In the first of our five-part interview, Dread & Delight Artist Timothy Horn, creator of “Mother-Lode” discusses his creative inspiration and educational background.

Another dramatic work included in the exhibit is “Mother-Load,” created by the artist Timothy Horn. The sculpture is a child-sized, Cinderella-like carriage that was created using a variety of materials, but most notably it is coated in a layer of rock sugar and shellac.

The piece was created originally for a show at the de Young Museum in San Francisco. It was inspired by the “rags-to-riches story” of Alma Spreckels, the collector whose sugar fortune was used to found what is now part of the museum. She came from modest beginnings and rose to great wealth. She was never fully accepted by San Francisco society and had distant relationships with all of her children. This piece is Horn’s take on a gilded 18th-century Neapolitan sedan chair that Spreckels used as a phone booth in her home. Spreckels had a less-than-perfect life though she achieved great wealth. Horn’s sculpture explores and highlights the temporary nature of our existence while at the same time calling into question the values in a society that helped to shape the life of a person like Alma Spreckels.

Anderson Turner / ABJ/Ohio.com correspondent
Read More

An Interview with Mernet Larsen Pt. 5

https://youtu.be/NYWC7_qIf0A

In the final part of our interview, Mernet Larsen discusses how she translates reality into geometry.

“Larsen’s statement says she is working ‘to offer a new perspective unto life.’ Certainly this exhibit offers a look at an artist who is doing contemplative and deeply investigative work, and gives us a chance to better know a unique voice.”

Anderson Turner, Akron Beacon Journal 

Mernet Larsen (b. 1940) makes intriguing, humor- and tension-infused paintings featuring geometric figures that inhabit space in ways that defy gravity and conventional viewpoints. The artist stages ordinary scenes—people playing cards or eating dinner, a faculty meeting, reading in bed—but constructs them with vertiginous, skewed spatial relationships that convey a sense of precariousness. The disorienting treatment of perspective places the viewer inside and outside of the paintings at the same time, “as if they’re wearing the situation,” the artist describes. Along with the figures’ deadpan facial expressions and subtle body language, Larsen’s puzzling compositions reveal the essence of everyday human interaction. Wry, anxious and awkward, the paintings are frozen monuments that are simultaneously alien and familiar.

Mernet Larsen: The Ordinary, Reoriented is organized by the Akron Art Museum with support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and the Ohio Arts Council.

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An Interview with Mernet Larsen Pt. 4

In part four, the artist discusses the role of humor in her work.

“Larsen’s statement says she is working ‘to offer a new perspective unto life.’ Certainly this exhibit offers a look at an artist who is doing contemplative and deeply investigative work, and gives us a chance to better know a unique voice.”

Anderson Turner, Akron Beacon Journal 

Mernet Larsen (b. 1940) makes intriguing, humor- and tension-infused paintings featuring geometric figures that inhabit space in ways that defy gravity and conventional viewpoints. The artist stages ordinary scenes—people playing cards or eating dinner, a faculty meeting, reading in bed—but constructs them with vertiginous, skewed spatial relationships that convey a sense of precariousness. The disorienting treatment of perspective places the viewer inside and outside of the paintings at the same time, “as if they’re wearing the situation,” the artist describes. Along with the figures’ deadpan facial expressions and subtle body language, Larsen’s puzzling compositions reveal the essence of everyday human interaction. Wry, anxious and awkward, the paintings are frozen monuments that are simultaneously alien and familiar.

Mernet Larsen: The Ordinary, Reoriented is organized by the Akron Art Museum with support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and the Ohio Arts Council.

Read More

An Interview with Mernet Larsen Pt. 3

In part 3, Mernet Larsen discusses her use of ordinary settings for her unconventional paintings.

“Larsen’s statement says she is working ‘to offer a new perspective unto life.’ Certainly this exhibit offers a look at an artist who is doing contemplative and deeply investigative work, and gives us a chance to better know a unique voice.”

Anderson Turner, Akron Beacon Journal 

Mernet Larsen (b. 1940) makes intriguing, humor- and tension-infused paintings featuring geometric figures that inhabit space in ways that defy gravity and conventional viewpoints. The artist stages ordinary scenes—people playing cards or eating dinner, a faculty meeting, reading in bed—but constructs them with vertiginous, skewed spatial relationships that convey a sense of precariousness. The disorienting treatment of perspective places the viewer inside and outside of the paintings at the same time, “as if they’re wearing the situation,” the artist describes. Along with the figures’ deadpan facial expressions and subtle body language, Larsen’s puzzling compositions reveal the essence of everyday human interaction. Wry, anxious and awkward, the paintings are frozen monuments that are simultaneously alien and familiar.

Mernet Larsen: The Ordinary, Reoriented is organized by the Akron Art Museum with support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and the Ohio Arts Council.

Read More
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